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Chinese gamer files for divorce after wife sells his in-game items

Chinese gamer files for divorce after wife sells his in-game items

| April 29, 2014

 

If you thought silly game-related breakups were only for young, inexperienced couples after last week’s story, think again. This week, Netease Games brings us another tale of the absurd.

(See: Chinese gamer breaks up with her boyfriend for stealing her blue buff)

The couple in question, Mrs. Jing and Mr. Zhang (not their real names), are part of China’s post-80s generation, and have been married for three years. Zhang’s gaming habits have apparently been an issue of contention for some time, with Jing having tried everything, including password-protecting the couple’s computer, to get him to cut back.

When even that didn’t work, Jing logged into his game account (the article doesn’t specify which game) and sold all of his in-game items. When Zhang logged in the next day and discovered his wife had done this, he was enraged, and after a huge fight over it, he went to the Shangyang District People’s Court and filed for divorce.

Depending on your point of view, this story has a happy ending, though. The judge who was assigned the case looked into it and found the situation ridiculous, and arranged for some mediation before divorce proceedings began. Zhang apparently has since had a change of heart and dropped his divorce filing, promising to beat his internet gaming addiction. Jing forgave him, and the two remain married.

(via Netease Games)


Related:
  • Chinese anti-game activist Tao Hongkai attacks League of Legends players

tao-hongkai

Tao Hongkai is at it again, and this time he has League of Legends squarely in his sights.



 

Comments

  1. LOL

  2. Boom

  3. Gaming is serious business!

  4. dafaq

  5. lol

  6. vidrogames are serious

  7. Stupidity!

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